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call at the Falklands War Memorial in Norwich

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Published:
06:00 21 April 2022



An “inspiring” young Falklands War hero who died in the conflict could receive a memorial 40 years later.

Frank Armes, 21, an avid Norwich City fan who grew up in the Heartsease area, joined the Royal Navy on January 17, 1978, which was a lifelong dream.


Frank Armes, who grew up in Norwich and died in the Falklands War in 1982 aged 21
– Credit: Sonya Duncan

The marine engineer was tragically killed on May 25, 1982, along with 18 other crew members, while stationed on HMS Coventry off West Falkland.

He was said to have been at the front of the ship in the engine room at the time of the attack which also left 30 injured.


An aerial view of the Type 42 Destroyer, HMS Coventry in service during the Falklands War

An aerial view of the Type 42 Destroyer, HMS Coventry in service during the Falklands War
– Credit: PA

And now his pal, Gavin Scott, 58, from Costessey, who met Mr Armes during Navy training after he arrived aged 16, has launched a Crowdfunder to raise 2 £000 for a permanent memorial bench in the city.


Falklands veteran Gavin Scott calls for a town memorial to the former Norfolk naval engineer

Gavin Scott as he trained to become an able seaman for the Royal Navy
– Credit: Sonya Duncan

Mr Scott, who was an able seaman and on HMS Penelope during the war, said: ‘Frank had a wicked, dry sense of humour. He was one of those people you aspired to be like. was a great sportsman, he loved Norwich.

“The attack on HMS Coventry and Frank’s death have marked me for 40 years. He was my friend and my brother in arms. People in the services become my family.

“It’s soul destroying when you lose a ship.”


FALKLANDS WAR: British paratroopers provide emergency medical treatment to wounded comrades

THE FALKLANDS WAR: British paratroopers performing emergency medical treatment on wounded comrades under fire on Mount Longdon during the Falklands campaign.
– Credit: PA

The father-of-three, who left the navy in 1988, said it was heartbreaking and wrong that there was no permanent memorial in Norwich for people to remember the 255 British servicemen who died in the conflict of the Falklands.

“It’s the forgotten war. Many of the soldiers who lost their lives were young men,” he added.


Falklands veteran Gavin Scott calls for a town memorial to the former naval engineer mechani

Falklands War veteran Gavin Scott of Costessey with a 40th anniversary commemorative flag
– Credit: Sonya Duncan

Mr Scott thought there was strong support from people living in Norwich for a memorial bench and was shocked at the response to his fundraiser which has already raised £1,200.

He said the lack of support from Norwich City Council contrasted with the community support from organizations in Stalham which would mark the life of Royal Navy serviceman Richard Dunkerley, 22, who lived in the town and died on May 21, 1982 , while on HMS. Ardent, with a memorial service.


Falklands veteran Gavin Scott calls for a town memorial to the former Norfolk naval engineer

Richard Dunkerley, of Stalham, who died in the Falklands War in 1982 aged 22
– Credit: Sonya Duncan

A spokeswoman for Norwich City Council said: ‘Officers have been in contact with Mr Scott to push forward the idea of ​​placing a memorial bench in one of Norwich’s parks.

“The council is also pleased to engage with any organizers wishing to plan an official commemorative event in Norwich.”

To donate to the memorial bench, click here.

The Falklands War

Fighting broke out by air, land and sea between Argentina and the UK in 1982 during 10 weeks of undeclared war.


A view from the deck of HMS Hermes as tugs pull her away from Portsmouth dock as she prepares

A view from the deck of HMS Hermes as tugs pull her away from Portsmouth dock as she prepares to sail to the Falkland Islands.
– Credit: PA

The conflict involved two British dependent territories in the South Atlantic – the Falkland Islands and its territorial dependency, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.

It started on April 2 when Argentina invaded and occupied the Falkland Islands, followed by the invasion of South Georgia the next day.

On April 5, the British government dispatched a naval task force to engage the Argentine Navy and Air Force before launching an amphibious assault on the islands.


A Royal Navy sailor at the controls of an anti-aircraft gun aboard HMS Hermes as the British task force sails along

A Royal Navy sailor wielding an anti-aircraft gun aboard HMS Hermes as the British task force sails south towards the Falkland Islands.
– Credit: PA

The conflict lasted 74 days and ended with an Argentine surrender on June 14, returning the islands to British control.


Steel helmets abandoned by the Argentinian armed forces which surrendered at Goose Green in the British Falklands

Steel helmets left by the Argentine Armed Forces who surrendered at Goose Green to British Falklands Task Force troops.
– Credit: PA

A total of 649 Argentine servicemen, 255 British servicemen and three Falkland Islanders died during the hostilities.


Smoke pours from the Type 42 destroyer HMS A Sheffield as fire rages through the warship after she aw

Smoke billows from the Type 42 destroyer HMS A Sheffield as fire rages through the warship after it was hit by an Argentine missile fired from an Argentine aircraft somewhere off the Falklands.
– Credit: PA